Niewöhner

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Fr diese These spricht auch der Umstand, indem sie ihnen keine Rose anbietet.

Niewöhner

k Followers, Following, Posts - See Instagram photos and videos from Jannis Niewöhner (@jannisniewoehner_official). Jannis Niewöhner, Actor: Rubinrot. Jannis Niewöhner was born on March 30, in Krefeld, North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany. He is an actor, known for. Nationalität, Deutschland. Sprachen, Englisch. Dialekte, Bairisch, Berlinerisch, Hessisch, Kölsch, Norddeutsch. Größe, cm. Haarfarbe, dunkelblond.

Jannis Niewöhner

Niewöhner ist der Familienname folgender Personen: Friedrich Niewöhner (​–), deutscher Philosophiehistoriker; Jannis Niewöhner (* ). Jannis Niewöhner war einige Jahre mit Emilia Schüle, bekannt aus dem Jugendfilm ‚Freche Mädchen', liiert. Der Schauspieler lebt in einer Wohngemeinschaft. k Followers, Following, Posts - See Instagram photos and videos from Jannis Niewöhner (@jannisniewoehner_official).

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Niewöhner Jannis Niewöhner vorne gerät als Goldmund in mehr als eine missliche Lage. Best Buddies: Jannik Schümann l. Matthias von Schwedlitz. Nicht nur Emilia Schüle zeigt sich superstylisch, auch ihre Schauspielkollegen Fahri YardimAlicia von RittbergAnna Maria Mühe, Rbb News Schümann und Jannis Niewöhner v. Jannis Niewöhner ist ein deutscher Schauspieler. Jannis Niewöhner (* März in Krefeld-Hüls) ist ein deutscher Schauspieler. Inhaltsverzeichnis. 1 Leben; 2 Filmografie (Auswahl); 3 Auszeichnungen. Niewöhner ist der Familienname folgender Personen: Friedrich Niewöhner (​–), deutscher Philosophiehistoriker; Jannis Niewöhner (* ). Jannis Niewöhner war einige Jahre mit Emilia Schüle, bekannt aus dem Jugendfilm ‚Freche Mädchen', liiert. Der Schauspieler lebt in einer Wohngemeinschaft.

Most Byzantine buildings employed arcades with built arches instead of colonnades with monolithic architraves.

The only major exception was the capital city of The only major exception was the capital city of Constantinople where entablatures continued to be newly carved from Proconnesian marble throughout the fifth and sixth centuries.

This paper unites the known specimens for the first time, including numerous hitherto unpublished entablature blocks in the collection of the Archaeological Museum Istanbul.

A considerable number of externally dated entablatures serve as corner stones of a typology and reveal how the formal repertoire developed over time.

The earlier fourth century was characterized by new and varied types of acanthus leaves that emerged at Docimium in Phrygia, the most important marble quarry and workshop on the central Anatolian high plateau.

When Theodosius I initiated a new building boom at Constantinople in the late fourth century, the focus shifted to the nearby quarry island of Proconnesus.

The ensuing mass production led to simplifications of the formal repertoire and reductions in quality, and the fifth-century developments may be described in terms of decline.

The last remnants of the Roman tradition were finally shed and lost around AD. Thus freed of restraining conventions, the sixth century and in particular the prosperous Justinianic period came up with novel forms and established a stylistic repertoire of its own.

It harked back at the Roman tradition in ways that confirmed both its death and how it continued to inform the formal development in afterlife.

Volume: 67 Page Numbers: Publication Date: Publication Name: Istanbuler Mitteilungen The South Vestibule of Hagia Sophia at Istanbul. The Ornamental Mosaics and the Private Door of the Patriarchate more.

Together these suggest the vestibule Together these suggest the vestibule originally functioned as an anteroom of the patriarchate and only later became the imperial entrance to the Great Church.

Publication Date: Publication Name: Dumbarton Oaks Papers Late Antique and Byzantine History , Late Antique and Byzantine Studies , Byzantine Studies , Byzantine History , Byzantine Architecture , and 4 more Byzantine Iconography , Byzantine Archaeology , Byzantine Mosaics , and Byzantine art Byzantine Iconography , Byzantine Archaeology , Byzantine Mosaics , and Byzantine art.

Historisch-topographische Überlegungen zum Trierer Prozessionselfenbein, dem Christusbild an der Chalke, Kaiserin Irenes Triumph im Bilderstreit und der Euphemiakirche am Hippodrom more.

The date of the carving and the identities of the depicted are unknown, but the scene is generally understood to allude to past and possibly fictitious events that are placed in a generic setting.

This paper first makes the point that the ivory cannot date from the early Byzantine period, because it shows the main Chalke Gate of the imperial palace at Constantinople decorated with a bust of Christ, and such icons do not yet seem to have been on public display in sixth-century Constantinople.

Secondly, the article proceeds to suggest an alternative reading of the iconography, according to which it may depict a historical event in its real setting: Empress Irene renovates the church of St Euphemia in front of the Hippodrome in , shortly after having put up the bust of Christ on the Chalke Gate.

The ivory may therefore commemorate two orthodox deeds of Irene and should be contemporary, because later Christ Chalkites was refashioned not as a bust, but as a full length figure.

Publication Date: Publication Name: Millennium Byzantine Studies , Byzantine History , Byzantine Archaeology , Byzantine art , and Ivory Carving.

The Rotunda at the Myrelaion in Constantinople. Pilaster Capitals, Mosaics, and Brick Stamps more. Publication Date: Publication Name: The Byzantine Court: Source of Power and Culture, International Sevgi Gönül Byzantine Studies Symposium 2.

Late Antique Archaeology , Byzantine Architecture , Byzantine Archaeology , Late Antique Art and Archaeology , Graeco-Roman Mosaics and Wall Paintings , and 2 more Byzantine art and Brick Stamps Byzantine art and Brick Stamps.

Neues zu den Tetrarchenfiguren in Venedig und zur ihrer Aufstellung in Konstantinopel more. The fragment can be identified as a part of the columns that once carried the porphyry Tetrarchs, which are The fragment can be identified as a part of the columns that once carried the porphyry Tetrarchs, which are today built into the treasury of San Marco.

The Pietra del bando on the square in front of San Marco may also have belonged to the same monument. A heal that is missing from the Tetrarchs in Venice was found near the Philadelphion at Istanbul, and the name of the Philadelphion derives from the Tetrarchs being linked in a brotherly embrace; the heal proves where the columns came from and that they had already been fragmented before they left Constantinople.

The Venetians may have taken the monument to pieces themselves in order to facilitate transportation, after they had conquered the Byzantine capital during the Fourth Crusade.

Alternatively the fragmentation may already have effected in the Early Byzantine period, when the columns, that must originally have been standing in one of the residential cities of the Tetrarchy, were brought to Constantinople for the decoration of the new capital.

At that time the columns may have been taken to pieces in order to re-cut one shaft in the form of an obelisk that was also erected on the Philadelphion.

Publication Date: Publication Name: Istanbuler Mitteilungen Late Antique and Byzantine Studies , Late Antique Archaeology , Byzantine Studies , Byzantine Archaeology , Late Antique Art and Archaeology , and 9 more Late Roman Archaeology , Constantinople , Tetrarchy , Venice , Roman Sculpture , Byzantine art , Fourth Crusade , Theodosius , and Obelisk Late Roman Archaeology , Constantinople , Tetrarchy , Venice , Roman Sculpture , Byzantine art , Fourth Crusade , Theodosius , and Obelisk.

Der byzantinische Ursprungsbau more. The last substantial remodelling took place in An earlier phase is documented in the Khalili Portolan Atlas and dates back to The bell tower and south-east chapel survive; a courtyard gateway was demolished in On the basis of these elements it is possible to reconstruct the original building in the form of a Byzantine cross-in-square or as a church with ambulatory.

The edifice may be identical with a Greek Orthodox church of St Mary attested for , because when the Benedictine abbey was founded in an older Marian patrocinium appears to have been already in existence.

The early, pre dating of the original Byzantine building is evidence of the progressiveness of Palaiologan architecture at Constantinople.

The corbel table and ceramic ornamentation of the bell tower and courtyard gateway could have originated in the capital and then been transmitted to the provinces, where they are attested since the 14th century.

Publication Date: Publication Name: Jahrbuch des Deutschen Archäologischen Instituts Byzantine Studies , Byzantine Architecture , Byzantine Iconography , Byzantine monasticism , Constantinople , and 2 more Byzantine art and Istanbul Byzantine art and Istanbul.

Der frühbyzantinische Rundbau beim Myrelaion in Konstantinopel. Kapitelle, Mosaiken und Ziegelstempel more. The palace at the Myrelaion in Istanbul has been excavated by R.

Naumann reported the excavation in the same year, but most of the finds were not included in the report and have never been published. Floor mosaics Floor mosaics show the mythological hunter Akteon wielding a spear.

The iconography may have been the model for the Megalopsychia panel at the Yakto Complex in Daphne near Antiochia. Marble revetment has been imported from Dokimon on the Anatolian High Plateau, as has been confirmed by archaeometric analyses.

This early Byzantine innovation has so far been ascribed to the reuse of varied spolia in Rome. A number of brick stamps round off the corpus that has so far been published from the same find spot.

They as well as all other available evidence comply with a dating to around A. The early Byzantine complex at the Myrelaion may therefore be one of the earliest standing monuments of Constantinople.

It contained the largest domed hall of the city and probably served as a residency for a member of the imperial aristocracy, possibly for nobilissima Arcadia, a daughter of Arcadius and sister of Theodosius II.

In January the police delivered a large pilaster capital and two monumental leaf tips to the Istanbul Archaeological Museum. The pieces had been confiscated together and show the same patina as well as the same style.

They probably They probably belonged to the same large building and date from the fifth or sixth century AD. The pilaster capital is made of marble from Docimium, will have been part of a wall revetment and was most likely employed in a secular building.

The monumental leaf tips appear to consist of marble from Proconnesus. The combination of columns from Proconnesus with wall revetment from Docimium was common in early Byzantine Constantinople.

Feingezahnter Akanthus mit fleischigem Blatt. Wider die Umbildung und Auflösung antiker Formen. Zum Entstehen des Vortorkapitells more. Page Numbers: Publication Date: Publication Name: Syrien und seine Nachbarn von der Spätantike bis in die islamische Zeit.

Late Antique and Byzantine Studies , Late Antique Archaeology , Byzantine Studies , Byzantine Architecture , Byzantine Archaeology , and 3 more Late Antique Art and Archaeology , Constantinople , and Byzantine art Late Antique Art and Archaeology , Constantinople , and Byzantine art.

Byzantinische Gebälke im Archäologischen Museum Istanbul more. Im Herbst wurden innerhalb von drei Monaten rund ein halbes Hundert byzantinischer Gebälkstücke in der Sammlung des Archäologischen Museums Istanbul aufgenommen.

Diese Unternehmung hat das Ziel, Material für eine Typologie Kaiserzeitliche Gebälke lassen sich aufgrund solcher Untersuchungen relativ genau datieren.

Von den byzantinischen Gebälkstücken im Archäologischen Museum Istanbul sind bislang nur etwa die Hälfte veröffentlich und kaum eines gezeichnet worden.

Publication Date: Publication Name: Arastirma Sonuclari Toplantisi Anatolian Sites and Settlement History. Urbanism more.

The settlement pattern and material culture of Anatolia changed fundamentally from the mid-fifth century onwards, and this chapter attempts to synthesize evidence from various city sites into an overall scenario of when and why ancient The settlement pattern and material culture of Anatolia changed fundamentally from the mid-fifth century onwards, and this chapter attempts to synthesize evidence from various city sites into an overall scenario of when and why ancient urbanism came to an end and what happened thereafter.

As the fate of the cities turns out to have been closely related to that of the surrounding countryside, the development of rural settlements is also taken into consideration.

Urbanism was affected negatively and went into decline while the countryside reached unprecedented levels of prosperity. The surviving cities were newly fortified in the seventh century against Persian and Arab incursions.

The new strategic situation concentrated settlement activities on urban sites once more, while the defenceless countryside appears to have suffered badly from the incursions.

Later, when peace and prosperity returned to rural Anatolia during the middle Byzantine period, most cities seem to have been finally deserted.

By the time the Turks arrived on the scene in the later eleventh century, most of Anatolia was ruralized. Page Numbers: Publication Date: Publication Name: The Archaeology of Byzantine Anatolia.

From the End of Late Antiquity until the Coming of the Turks. Monasteries more. There is little evidence for continuity from the early to the later Byzantine periods among the monasteries of Anatolia.

In large parts of the countryside, the Arab raids may have caused a disruption of the earlier tradition. Most later Most later foundations were located elsewhere, typically on holy mountains and in more remote locations, which suggests less integration with the civilian population.

Evidence for urban monasteries is scarce until the later eleventh century, when they seem to have become more numerous, probably due to a general revival of Anatolian cities as refuges against the arriving Turks.

Late Antique and Byzantine Studies , Anatolian Studies , Anatolian Archaeology , Byzantine Studies , Byzantine Architecture , and 10 more Byzantine Archaeology , Monastic Architecture , Byzantine monasticism , Monasticism , History of Monasticism , Anatolian Archaeology Archaeology , Archaeology of Medieval Monasteries , Medieval Monasticism , Early Medieval Monasticism , and Byzantine history and archaeology Byzantine Archaeology , Monastic Architecture , Byzantine monasticism , Monasticism , History of Monasticism , Anatolian Archaeology Archaeology , Archaeology of Medieval Monasteries , Medieval Monasticism , Early Medieval Monasticism , and Byzantine history and archaeology.

The ruin occupies an isolated location next to a brook in the centre of a small valley and is surrounded by cultivated land. The house has a closed The house has a closed rectangular block form and is divided into a western and an eastern half.

The main entrance is in the east and gives onto an L-shaped corridor that connects to a large and bright main room and — probably via a wooden staircase — to an upper storey with the same fl oor plan.

The western part of the building is arranged around a central hall and consists of smaller rooms and three heated bathing rooms on the south side.

This tract would have been more private, whilst the eastern half with the large main rooms close to the main entrance appears suitable for the reception of guests.

Other block-shaped houses with similar ground plans and equally large, tall, and bright rooms elsewhere in Anatolia date from the early Byzantine period.

The new block-shaped houses seem to have replaced the traditional peristyle houses that stopped to be built after the Theodosian period.

Volume: 66 Page Numbers: Publication Date: Publication Name: Istanbuler Mitteilungen Late Antique and Byzantine Studies , Anatolian Studies , Anatolian Archaeology , Late Antique Archaeology , Greek Epigraphy , and 11 more Byzantine Studies , Byzantine Architecture , Byzantine Archaeology , Household Archaeology , Late Antique Art and Archaeology , Roman Baths Archaeology , Anatolian Archaeology Archaeology , Rural Archaeology , Ancient Caria , Asia Minor , and Byzantine history and archaeology Byzantine Studies , Byzantine Architecture , Byzantine Archaeology , Household Archaeology , Late Antique Art and Archaeology , Roman Baths Archaeology , Anatolian Archaeology Archaeology , Rural Archaeology , Ancient Caria , Asia Minor , and Byzantine history and archaeology.

Churchbuilding in Anatolia during the Reign of Constantine and his Dynasty more. The paper is subdivided into the following five sections: 1.

Written sources; 2. The archaeological record - general stagnation and a dearth of new building projects; 3. Methodological problems and the lack of evidence, in particular for Methodological problems and the lack of evidence, in particular for rural churches; 4.

Urban churches; 5. City centres without new church buildings. Publication Date: Publication Name: Acta XVI Congressus Internationalis Archaeologiae Christianae.

Costantino e i Costantinidi. Late Antique and Byzantine Studies , Anatolian Studies , Anatolian Archaeology , Late Antique Archaeology , Byzantine Studies , and 11 more Late Antiquity , Byzantine Architecture , Byzantine Archaeology , Late Antique Art and Archaeology , Hellenistic and Roman Asia Minor , Anatolian Archaeology Archaeology , Early Christian Architecture , Early Christian Archaeology , Asia Minor , Constantine the Great, Roman Empire, Early Christianity , and Byzantine history and archaeology Late Antiquity , Byzantine Architecture , Byzantine Archaeology , Late Antique Art and Archaeology , Hellenistic and Roman Asia Minor , Anatolian Archaeology Archaeology , Early Christian Architecture , Early Christian Archaeology , Asia Minor , Constantine the Great, Roman Empire, Early Christianity , and Byzantine history and archaeology.

The late Late Antique origins of Byzantine palace architecture more. Publication Date: Publication Name: The Emperor's House.

Palaces from Augustus to the Age of Absolutism. The city of Iznik, called Nikaia or Nicaea in ancient times, is located in northwest Anatolia, Turkey.

Nicaea is renowned especially for the first Council of Nicaea convened by the Roman emperor Constantine in AD in an attempt to Nicaea is renowned especially for the first Council of Nicaea convened by the Roman emperor Constantine in AD in an attempt to unify the Church.

During an international field course on the geophysical exploration of archaeological targets we detected the remains of a small previously unknown Byzantine church on a fallow lot of land inside the city.

We found the contours of the nave, two aisles and three apses as well as evidence of a partly refilled grave. The geophysical measurements indicate that the foundations of the church consist of low-porosity hard rock with a low magnetic susceptibility, probably limestone or sandstone embedded in fluvial sediments.

Publication Date: Sep Publication Name: Archaeological Prospection. Byzantine Architecture and Byzantine Archaeology. Who is Afraid of the Fall of Rome?

Prosperity and the End of Antiquity in Central Western Anatolia more. Publication Date: Publication Name: Archaeological Research in Western Central Anatolia.

Late Antique and Byzantine History , Late Antique and Byzantine Studies , Late Antique Archaeology , Byzantine Studies , Late Antiquity , and 2 more Byzantine Archaeology and Byzantine history and archaeology Byzantine Archaeology and Byzantine history and archaeology.

Byzantinische Stadtmauern in Anatolien. Vom Statussymbol zum Bollwerk gegen die Araber more. Viele frühbyzantinische Stadtmauern in Anatolien haben repräsentativen Charakter: Insbesondere die Tore zeichnen sich durch Doppelturmanlagen, dekoratives Mauerwerk, Bauskulptur und figürliche Reliefs aus.

Die Mauerringe sind umfangreich, Die Mauerringe sind umfangreich, die Mauerstärken dagegen gering. Solche Befestigungen wurden um errichtet und waren Teil einer letzten Blütezeit des anatolischen Städtebaus.

Diese Befestigungen sind dicker und fester und haben einen ausgeprägten Wehrcharakter. Wahrscheinlich stammen sie aus der Zeit der Araberkriege, denen Anatolien seit dem 7.

Im Vergleich wird deutlich, dass der frühbyzantinische Mauerbau der Zeit um vom Bedürfnis nach Manifestation von Macht und Hierarchie geprägt war.

Publication Date: Publication Name: Aktuelle Forschungen zur Konstruktion, Funktion und Semantik antiker Stadtbefestigungen. Late Antique and Byzantine History , Late Antique and Byzantine Studies , Anatolian Studies , Anatolian Archaeology , Late Antique Archaeology , and 14 more Hellenistic and Roman Fortifications , Byzantine Studies , Late Antiquity , Byzantine History , Byzantine Architecture , Byzantine Archaeology , Anatolian Archaeology Archaeology , Fortifications , Medieval Fortifications , Late Roman and early Byzantine fortifications , Early Medieval Fortifications , Byzantine fortifications , Castles and Fortifications , and Ancient City Walls Hellenistic and Roman Fortifications , Byzantine Studies , Late Antiquity , Byzantine History , Byzantine Architecture , Byzantine Archaeology , Anatolian Archaeology Archaeology , Fortifications , Medieval Fortifications , Late Roman and early Byzantine fortifications , Early Medieval Fortifications , Byzantine fortifications , Castles and Fortifications , and Ancient City Walls.

The city of Iznik lies in the north-west Anatolian province of Bithynia on the eastern shore of an eponymous lake. In antiquity Iznik was called Nicaea.

During a course on archaeological applications of geophysical technology in early The survey led to the discovery of a Byzantine church. The church lies south-west of Deniz Street and appears to have been a cross-in-square building from the middle to late Byzantine period.

Its orientation follows the Hippodamian grid plan, which proves that the street grid was adopted throughout the urban area.

Byzantine Studies , Byzantine Architecture , Byzantine Archaeology , Geophysical Survey , Ancient Urbanism , and 3 more Nikaia , Nicaea , and Iznik Nikaia , Nicaea , and Iznik.

Journal Name: Istanbulber Mitteilung 57 Publication Date: Publication Name: Istanbuler Mitteilungen Anatolian Studies , Anatolian Archaeology , Byzantine Studies , Byzantine Architecture , Byzantine Archaeology , and 4 more Byzantine monasticism , Anatolian Archaeology Archaeology , Priene , and Byzantine history and archaeology Byzantine monasticism , Anatolian Archaeology Archaeology , Priene , and Byzantine history and archaeology.

Archäologie und die "Dunklen Jahrunderte" im byzantinischen Anatolien more. Some 25 years ago C. He for the first time referred mainly to archaeological evidence in order to determine the disputed character of the He for the first time referred mainly to archaeological evidence in order to determine the disputed character of the so-called Dark Ages in Byzantine Anatolia.

The argument evolved around the question whether the Persian and Arab incursions from the seventh to the ninth century caused a sudden disruption of ancient urbanism and a catastrophic beginning of the Middle Ages.

Alternatively towns might have continued to exist and their change from ancient to medieval appearance came about by gradual transformation.

Written sources, epigraphic, and numismatic evidence alone have not been conclusive. This is why Foss brought the archaeological evidence in the discussion: As a one-to-one image of the historical situation, archaeological evidence seemed less likely to cause disagreement about its interpretation.

Foss contrasts urban splendour and size as well as diverse public buildings of late antiquity with comparably simple and small kastra and churches of the Middle Ages.

He explains the disparity by a disruption of urban life. According to Foss the Dark Ages cut off all ancient traditions and thereby cleared the way for a new start of an independent medieval development.

As proof Foss refers to a lacuna in the archaeological record during the Dark Ages and as a reason he gives the barbarian incursions.

This catastrophic scenario has been generally accepted. The apparent contrast between late antiquity and the Middle Ages seemed to rule out a continuous, uninterrupted development through transformation.

That contrast however is but the result of a simplistic image of late antiquity as a homogenous period of urban growth and prosperity. Under closer scrutiny the archaeological evidence reveals that the last major urban building campaigns in Anatolia took place around A.

Private dwellings irregularly invaded formerly public spaces and some towns can even be shown to have shrunken in size.

Accordingly there is no reason to assume a priori that urban development was disrupted in the intervening period, and to conclude ex silentio that Anatolia witnessed a de-urbanisation during the Dark Ages.

Furthermore the lack of coins from that period, which Foss has taken to indicate economic discontinuity, is nowadays explained by a change in monetary policy and may not be used as evidence against urban continuity.

The same holds true for ceramics from the Dark Ages: A quarter of a century ago Foss had to believe such ceramics did not exist.

By now thick strata rich in ceramics that used to be ignored as not datable have been identified with the period in question, for example in Limyra.

It seems more than likely that ceramics of the Dark Ages exist elsewhere as well, but have so far not been recognised as such.

Accordingly their lack does not lend itself to an argument ex silentio against urban continuity. This leads to a revision of the paradigm of contraction from polis to kastron.

The alternative scenario can not be ruled out: Towns may have continued to exist outside the fortifications, as had happened earlier on in late antiquity: Chavdar Kirilov in his contribution to this volume makes this point with respect to late antique town walls.

Late antique kastra, as opposed to town walls, were not intended to defend civilian settlements. In some cases they might also have served as a safe haven for the civilian population, for example in Nikopolis ad Istrum: Here the Byzantines built a new kastron after re-conquering the place from the Huns in the second half of the fifth century.

Next to a church, possibly the cathedral, the kastron enclosed much free space, where the civilian population might have assembled in case of an attack, as Andrew Poulter suggests.

It only secured the cathedral and the palace. The surrounding town had its own circuit of walls, and the suburban population fled there to seek shelter from violence.

A wider circuit that included the loosely settled suburbs would have defied the advice of a contemporary manual on strategy, the so called Anonymus Byzantinus: gardens, parks, and lawns inside the walls that resulted in long circuits were — according to the Anonymus — to be admitted only far away from the border, where the enemy could not launch a sudden and surprising attack.

Otherwise there would probably not have been enough time to assemble the troops necessary for the defence of extended fortifications.

Justinian acted accordingly when he restored the walls of Cappadocian Caesarea in the hinterland of the Persian border. As Procopius informs us, the old fortification had enclosed distant hills in order to prevent them from serving an aggressor as bastions against the town.

These hills and much free space within the walls had at no time been populated. Procopius considers such an extended circuit as unreasonably long for both maintenance and defence, and Justinian had it shortened.

The same happened in many North African towns that were liable to rapid barbarian attacks from across the border. In Central and Western Anatolia life was comparably peaceful in late antiquity and no such kastra and reduced circuits were built.

Some towns even allowed their newly acquired fortifications to fall into disrepair: The late fourth-century circuit of Sagalassus in Pisidia was given up and used for dumping debris after the earthquake of The walls of Anemurium in Cilicia that had been built around were partly pulled down again to make space for a fifth-century church.

In Lycian Limyra the same happened with a church in the sixth century. In both cases the defensive function of the recently erected fortifications was affected and therefore must have been considered negligible.

All this changed radically in the Dark Ages, when from the seventh century onwards Anatolia came first under Persian and then under Arab attack.

The new situation can be compared to what the Balkans, the Near East, and North Africa were facing two centuries earlier, and the same kind of defences were built: The Mediterranean coast now lay open to sudden Arab raids from the sea.

These razzias will have left the towns close to the shore with no time to gather troops and men along the walls. Accordingly Limyra had its western circuit of walls renewed and the before-mentioned church was pulled down again, but the eastern circuit seems to have been given up, although people continued to live in that part of the town as well.

Other examples are Side, Patara, Miletus, and Ephesus, where new or newly shortened circuits enclosed only half or less of the ancient town. According to Foss they all date to the Dark Ages.

In inland Anatolia the situation was somewhat different and Page Numbers: Publication Date: Publication Name: Post Roman Towns, Trade and Settlement in Europe and Byzantium 2.

Byzatnium, Pliska and the Balkans. Late Antique and Byzantine Studies , Anatolian Studies , Anatolian Archaeology , Urban Studies , Urbanism , and 5 more Byzantine Studies , Byzantine Archaeology , Early Medieval And Medieval Settlement Archaeology , Fortified Settlements Archaeology , and Byzantine history and archaeology Byzantine Studies , Byzantine Archaeology , Early Medieval And Medieval Settlement Archaeology , Fortified Settlements Archaeology , and Byzantine history and archaeology.

Aizanoi and Anatolia. Town and countryside in late Late Antiquity more. Aizanoi and other Anatolian towns witnessed a last urban building boom around A.

Colonnaded streets and squares, walls, large houses, and baths manifested urban status and distinguished towns from villages. That changed during the That changed during the fifth and sixth centuries.

Urban building other than churches all but came to a standstill. The existing buildings were allowed to run down and formerly prestigious houses were deserted.

At the same time the countryside witnessed an unprecedented boom. The settled area and the number of settlements increased all over rural Anatolia, and the population would have done so too.

Rural churches met the same regionally varying standards as the urban ones. The overall result was a convergence of settlement patterns in town and countryside.

Where there are no older remains, there is nothing in the archaeological record to distinguish an urban from a rural settlement any more. The conjunction of urban decline and rural prosperity can be observed all over Anatolia and must have had some cause of more than local significance.

The last urban building boom around A. This may explain urban decline as well as rural prosperity: resources that had been concentrated on the towns until about A.

It follows that these resources had not been generated by the towns themselves, otherwise the resources would not have been available any more when the towns were in decline.

Publication Date: Publication Name: Millennium 3. Late Antique Archaeology , Byzantine Archaeology , and Late Antique Art and Archaeology.

The Significance of the Cross before, during, and after Iconoclasm: Early Christian Aniconism in Constantinople and Asia Minor more. This paper asks how and why the cross lost out to the icon.

The cross used to be the most important symbol of all Christendom, until Byzantium replaced it with the icon as primary attribute of Orthodox Christianity.

This happened as a This happened as a result of Byzantine Iconoclasm, when in the eighth and ninth centuries icons were substituted for crosses and vice versa.

Afterwards, the winning party, which favoured the icon, put all the blame on the cross and its adherents who allegedly started the dispute by destroying icons and replacing them with crosses.

However, this paper finds that at Constantinople and in Asia Minor — i. This poses the problem how Iconoclasm should have been possible without icons and how the cross could have become associated with the destruction of icons, if there were no such images to destroy and replace.

The solution is found through a closer look at the sequence of the Iconoclast controversy, which may be blamed on the icon as much as and more so than on the cross.

Thus, Iconoclasm appears to have been less about the destruction of icons and more about the import of image veneration to Constantinople and Asia Minor, where such had not been customary in early Christian times.

Ultimately, Iconoclasm and the demise of the cross seem to have been due to the seventh-century collapse of the Eastern Roman empire, when most formerly icon-venerating provinces were lost to Byzantine rule.

The remaining Byzantine rump state was apparently too small to accommodate the various early Christian traditions — iconic in some provinces and essentially aniconic in others, notably at Constantinople and in Asia Minor.

The ensuing, so-called Iconoclast controversy as to which tradition should prevail was eventually lost by the cross, and this can explain how and why Orthodoxy came to be focused on icon veneration instead.

Byzantine Studies , Aniconism , Byzantine Iconography , Early Christian Art , Constantinople , and 5 more Icons , Byzantine Mosaics , Asia Minor , Byzantine art , and Byzantine Iconoclasm Icons , Byzantine Mosaics , Asia Minor , Byzantine art , and Byzantine Iconoclasm.

Anthony Cutler - Philipp Niewöhner, Towards a History of Byzantine Ivory Carving from the Late 6th to the Late 9th Century more.

The Louvre apostle ivory, the Trier ivory, the Leo fragment in Berlin, the David casket in the Palazzo Venezia at Rome. Late Antique and Byzantine Studies , Byzantine Studies , Byzantine Iconography , Constantinople , Dark Ages History , and 2 more Byzantine art and Ivory Carving Byzantine art and Ivory Carving.

Zoomorphic Rainwater Spouts more. Byzantine architecture appears to have revived the ancient tradition of lion-headed rainwater spouts from the sixth century onwards for the drainage of domed churches.

The earliest example, the sixth-century church of St Polyeuktos at The earliest example, the sixth-century church of St Polyeuktos at Constantinople, includes other animals apart from lions, and this may be a Sasanian influence.

The ancient tradition may have reached Byzantium indirectly via Sasanian architecture, and the Byzantine spouts are constructed differently, forming the mouth pieces of long water channels that would have protruded beyond the roofline.

A direct copy of the ancient tradition, whereby the lion heads were of a part with the roof line or sima, is attested only once in the case of the tenth-century church of the Theotokos at the Monastery of Hosios Loukas.

Page Numbers: Publication Date: Publication Name: Fountains and Water Culture in Byzantium. Late Antique and Byzantine Studies , Anatolian Studies , Anatolian Archaeology , Late Antique Archaeology , Byzantine Studies , and 10 more Byzantine Architecture , Byzantine Iconography , Byzantine Archaeology , Late Antique Art and Archaeology , Anatolian Archaeology Archaeology , Byzantine Architectural Sculpture , Byzantine Art and Archaeolgy , Byzantine art , Genoa , and Early Byzantine Archaeology Byzantine Architecture , Byzantine Iconography , Byzantine Archaeology , Late Antique Art and Archaeology , Anatolian Archaeology Archaeology , Byzantine Architectural Sculpture , Byzantine Art and Archaeolgy , Byzantine art , Genoa , and Early Byzantine Archaeology.

Vom Sinnbild zum Abbild. Der justinianische Realismus und die Genese der byzantinischen Heiligentypologie more. This paper deals with two different modes of presentation in Byzantine pictorial art, idealistic and realistic.

Part one asks what meaning may be attached to the different modes. It is observed that the idealistic mode has a long It is observed that the idealistic mode has a long tradition in Roman art whilst the realistic mode was introduced fairly late during the early Byzantine period.

Part two observes that the realistic mode came to the forefront in the age of Justinian. It was used for contemporary figures and was probably meant to highlight earthly presence and availability.

A similar meaning seems to have been intended where saints were depicted in the same way. The realistic fashion may be traced back to the holy men and their earthly sanctity.

It was contrasted with the idealistic mode that stayed in use for biblical figures and martyrs, that is to say for the heavenly sphere.

Part three points to the same modes and their analogues use during the later Byzantine periods after iconoclasm. It becomes clear that middle and late Byzantine art depicted saints along the same lines as before iconoclasm.

Over a century of theological debate on icons seems to have done little more than confirm the pictorial tradition. Publication Date: Publication Name: Millennium 5.

Byzantine Iconography , Late Antique Art and Archaeology , Christian Iconography , and Byzantine art.

East and West. Zur Ambivalenz wilhelminischer Mosaiken am Beispiel der Erlöserkirche in Bad Homburg more. The Erlöserkirche at Bad Homburg was built between and at the instigation of Kaiser Wilhelm II.

It combines a neo-Romanesque exterior with Norman-Sicilian mosaics inside. Both were "Germanic" to the emperor, and the church Both were "Germanic" to the emperor, and the church embodied his all encompassing claim to the tradition of the medieval Holy Roman Empire of the German Nation.

Alternatively, the contemporary Byzantinist Ernst Gerland pointed to a Byzantine origin of the Norman-Sicilian models and thus subtly contradicted the "pan-Germanic" myth.

This "Byzantine" reading has prevailed ever since, but does not stand up to scrutiny. It only serves to obscure the "pan-Germanic" concept of the church.

This contribution restores the "Germanic" understanding and makes the point that the latter must be acknowledged in order to make proper sense of the church's art and architecture, but also in order to face rather than to downplay and conveniently forget the racist-chauvinist character of German imperialism.

Publication Date: Publication Name: Byzantinische Zeitschrift. Byzantine Studies , Norman Sicily , German Nationalism , Imperial Germany , Byzantine Mosaics , and 20th Century German Art.

Late Antique and Byzantine Studies , Late Antique Archaeology , Byzantine Studies , Byzantine Architecture , Byzantine Archaeology , and 5 more Late Antique Art and Archaeology , Romanisation , Acculturation and 'Romanisation' , Early Christian Architecture , and Early Christian Archaeology Late Antique Art and Archaeology , Romanisation , Acculturation and 'Romanisation' , Early Christian Architecture , and Early Christian Archaeology.

Varietas, Spolia, and the End of Antiquity in East and West more. The term 'varietas' has been used to describe the combination of various different column capitals, often re-used, in late antique churches at Rome and elsewhere in the West.

This variety appeares to be an inventive departure from the This variety appeares to be an inventive departure from the ancient canon, according to which any one row of columns employed a single type of capital.

It was suggested that 'varietas' had been invented accidentally through the re-use of spolia that were not available in large enough numbers to build the Constantinian basilicas at Rome each with a single type of capital.

However, recent archaeological discoveries show that 'varietas' was more common in the East, where secular monuments with newly carved 'varietas' appear to pre-date the Roman churches.

The Eastern examples range from column capitals to wall revetment and epistyles, from public buildings to houses, palaces, and churches, from Egypt to Syria, Anatolia, Conostantinople, and the Balkans, from basalt to lime stone and marble.

It seems that the Eastern 'varietas' came about for aesthetic reasons alone. The Western 'varietas' may thus be considered less of an accident.

The Roman churches may have followed a recent fashion from the East. Publication Date: Publication Name: Spolia Reincarnated.

Afterlives of Objects, Materials, and Spaces in Anatolia from Antiquity to the Ottoman Era. Late Antique and Byzantine Studies , Late Antique Archaeology , Byzantine Studies , Late Antiquity , Byzantine Architecture , and 4 more Byzantine Archaeology , Late Antique Art and Archaeology , Paleochristian and Late Antique Archaeology , and Byzantine art Byzantine Archaeology , Late Antique Art and Archaeology , Paleochristian and Late Antique Archaeology , and Byzantine art.

Late Antique and Byzantine Studies , Late Antique Archaeology , Byzantine Studies , Late Antiquity , Byzantine Architecture , and 6 more Byzantine Archaeology , Late Antique Art and Archaeology , Late Antiquity and Byzantium History and Art , Paleochristian and Late Antique Archaeology , Byzantine art , and Byzantine history and archaeology Byzantine Archaeology , Late Antique Art and Archaeology , Late Antiquity and Byzantium History and Art , Paleochristian and Late Antique Archaeology , Byzantine art , and Byzantine history and archaeology.

Byzantine Water Spouts with Zoomorphic Head and Channel more. The earliest example, the sixth- century church of St Polyeuktos at The earliest example, the sixth- century church of St Polyeuktos at Constantinople, includes other animals apart from lions, and this may be a Sasanian influence.

A direct copy of the ancient tradition, whereby the lion heads were of a part with the roof line or sima , is attested only once in the case of the tenth-century church of the Theotokos at the Monastery of Hosios Loukas.

Volume: 55 Page Numbers: Publication Date: Publication Name: Cahiers Archeologiques. Late Antique and Byzantine Studies , Byzantine Studies , Byzantine Architecture , Byzantine Archaeology , Medieval Art , and Byzantine art.

Healing Springs of Anatolia: St. Michael and the Problem of the Pagan Legacy more. Healing springs presented a special problem in the Christianization of the Roman Empire.

As pagan sanctuaries, these springs required a Christian response, but they could not be smashed like idols, dismantled like temples, or cut down As pagan sanctuaries, these springs required a Christian response, but they could not be smashed like idols, dismantled like temples, or cut down like holy trees.

How did the Christians deal with the pagan legacy of spring sanctuaries? An answer is provided by two case studies recently investigated through archaeological fieldwork, one at Miletus, on the west coast of Asia Minor, the other at Germia, on the central Anatolian High Plateau.

The former was closed in late antiquity, whilst the latter was relocated and prospered throughout the Byzantine period. Their contrasting fates confirm, as is argued in parts one and two of the paper, that the pagan legacy was considered a problem.

At first glance, the Christian strategies seem to be informed by the strictest separation of the pagan and Christian.

Only when the enigmatic figure of the archangel Michael is taken into consideration in part three of the paper does it become apparent that some Christian healing cults may in fact have emanated directly from or developed in close analogy to their pagan predecessors.

Thus, St. Michael seems to have been a particularly popular dedicatee of healing springs in Anatolia, where angels had already been invoked in antiquity, leaving the Christian archangel to appear as a credible agent for the unbroken continuation of healing cults.

Page Numbers: Publication Date: Publication Name: B. Pitarakis - G. Tanman eds , Life is Short, Art Long.

The Art of Healing in Byzantium. New Perspectives. Bronze Age Hüyüks, Iron Age Hill Top Forts, Roman Poleis, and Byzantine Pilgrimage in Germia and Its Vicinity.

Germia was a well-connected Byzantine polis in western-central Anatolia, famous for its healing waters and a church of St Michael.

After three years of survey the site can now be reconstructed: it included several other churches and After three years of survey the site can now be reconstructed: it included several other churches and monasteries, but little space for ordinary residential buildings.

This comes as a surprise, but can be explained by the discovery of two older Roman cities within walking-distance of Germia, where the ordinary people seem to have lived.

One of these cities, Mantalos, was home to a local cult of the pagan god Men. This may explain why the Christian healing centre was established at Germia.

Later, Mantalos shed its pagan legacy and was apparently renamed Eudoxias after a homonymous member of the Theodosian dynasty.

No Roman or Byzantine settlement of the region has a history extending back beyond the Iron Age, when the population retreated to fortified hilltop settlements and many sizable Bronze Age höyüks were deserted.

Publication Date: Publication Name: Anatolian Studies Late Antique and Byzantine Studies , Pilgrimage , Late Antique Archaeology , Byzantine Studies , Byzantine Architecture , and 5 more Byzantine Archaeology , Late Antique Art and Archaeology , Archaeology of pilgrimage , Roman Archaeology , and Byzantine history and archaeology Byzantine Archaeology , Late Antique Art and Archaeology , Archaeology of pilgrimage , Roman Archaeology , and Byzantine history and archaeology.

Die Michaelskirche in Germia Galatien, Türkei. Ein kaiserlicher Wallfahrtsort und sein provinzielles Umfeld more.

This papar presents preliminary results of a survey of the Church of St Michael at Germia in central Anatlia, of the surrounding pilgrimage site, and of its rural hinterland.

The church had at least three different building phases The church had at least three different building phases: Originally a three-aisled basilica, it was first errected with columns and brick arches like comparable churches at Constantinople; this phase dates from the early Byzantine period, probably from the fifth century.

A later addition included two more ailes and a two-storied narthex with wide stone arches on piers, following central Anatolian building traditions; this work may date from the sixth century.

A third phase with vaulting, vault mosaics and a central dome dates from the middle Byzantine period.

Apart from the church, a number of other ruins, by all appearances Byzantine, have been discovered at Germia, and geophysical prospection has been carried out at some of them.

Byzantine carved marbles originated from several ancient quarries at Germia and in the neighbouring Dindymon Mountains, as has been acertained by archaeometric analyses.

A dozen new inscriptions also date from the early Byzantine period. In the surrounding countryside no ruins remain to be investigated, although ceramics, carved marbles and inscriptions provide evidence of various settlements with a tradition reaching back to the Bronze Age.

Publication Date: Publication Name: Archäologischer Anzeiger. Late Antique and Byzantine Studies , Anatolian Studies , Anatolian Archaeology , Late Antique Archaeology , Byzantine Studies , and 4 more Byzantine Architecture , Byzantine Archaeology , Late Antique Art and Archaeology , and Anatolian Archaeology Archaeology Byzantine Architecture , Byzantine Archaeology , Late Antique Art and Archaeology , and Anatolian Archaeology Archaeology.

Germia Regional Survey and Settlement History more. The Byzantine Pilgrimage Site and Its History more.

Late Antique and Byzantine Studies , Anatolian Studies , Anatolian Archaeology , Late Antique Archaeology , Greek Epigraphy , and 14 more Archaeological geophysics Archaeology , Byzantine Studies , Late Antiquity , Byzantine Architecture , Byzantine Archaeology , Late Antique Art and Archaeology , Archaeological Geophysics , Anatolian Archaeology Archaeology , Byzantine Epigraphy , Greek and Roman Epigraphy , Paleochristian and Late Antique Archaeology , Epigraphy , Early Byzantine Archaeology , and Byzantine history and archaeology Archaeological geophysics Archaeology , Byzantine Studies , Late Antiquity , Byzantine Architecture , Byzantine Archaeology , Late Antique Art and Archaeology , Archaeological Geophysics , Anatolian Archaeology Archaeology , Byzantine Epigraphy , Greek and Roman Epigraphy , Paleochristian and Late Antique Archaeology , Epigraphy , Early Byzantine Archaeology , and Byzantine history and archaeology.

Germia and Vicinity. Western Galatia during the Roman and Byzantine Periods more. Arbeiten in Milet in den Jahren bis Chronik, neue Befunde aus antiker, byzantinischer und türkischer Zeit sowie Denkmalpflege more.

This paper first chronicles five more years of work at Miletus and then presents the following new, as yet unpublished findings: An excavation in front of the theatre cave has unearthed the foundations of a significant building that This paper first chronicles five more years of work at Miletus and then presents the following new, as yet unpublished findings: An excavation in front of the theatre cave has unearthed the foundations of a significant building that probably dates from the Hellenistic period, as well as several Byzantine ruins A.

Investigation of the Byzantine city walls from the Invasion period has led to the discovery of a minor gate, probably a sally port S.

On Humeitepe, a small Turkish mosque or so-called mescit has been discovered Ph. A survey on Humeitepe confirms the ancient settlement history of this urban area through the analysis of small finds Ch.

Berns — S. New palynological findings improve our understanding of the Byzantine settlement history in the vicinity and the hinterland of the city A.

In addition, the paper also reports extensive site management and conservation work. All Titles TV Episodes Celebs Companies Keywords Advanced Search.

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Show HTML View more styles. Episodes Seasons. Maria von Burgund 3 episodes, Jannis Niewöhner Maximilian 3 episodes, Alix Poisson Margareta von York 3 episodes, Jean-Hugues Anglade König Ludwig XI.

Johanna von Hallewyn 3 episodes, Stefan Pohl Wolfgang von Polheim 3 episodes, Nicolas Wanczycki Guillaume Hugonet 3 episodes, Sylvie Testud Adolf von Egmond 3 episodes, Johannes Krisch Haug von Werdenberg 3 episodes, Harald Windisch Olivier Le Daim 3 episodes, Lili Epply Rosina von Kraig 3 episodes, Max Baissette de Malglaive Dauphin Charles 3 episodes, Sebastian Blomberg Jan Coppenhole 3 episodes, Christoph Luser Franchois Coppenhole 3 episodes, Aaron Friesz Bertram 3 episodes, Martin Wuttke Ulrich Fugger 3 episodes, Yvon Back Guy de Brimeu 3 episodes, Caroline Godard

Niewöhner Anatolian Archaeology Archaeology Niewöhner 1 Folge Berlin Tag Und Nacht. The iconography may have been the model for the Megalopsychia panel at the Yakto Complex in Daphne near Antiochia. Where there are no older remains, there is nothing in the archaeological record to distinguish an Tschick Stream Deutsch from a rural settlement any more. Conversely, a focus on the preservation of ancient cityscapes may also explain why western Asia Minor as the Niewöhner urbanised part Niewöhner the region did not develop a Byzantine architectural style of its own. Late Antique and Byzantine StudiesLate Antique ArchaeologyByzantine StudiesByzantine ArchitectureByzantine Archaeologyand 5 more Late Antique Art and ArchaeologyLate Antique LiturgyLyciaLate Antique and Byzantine Archaeology, Architecture and LetS Dance 2021 Video of Artand Bauer Sucht Frau 2021 Gerhard history and archaeology Late Antique Art and ArchaeologyLate Antique LiturgyLyciaLate Antique and Byzantine Archaeology, Architecture and History of Artand Byzantine history and archaeology. Reihe A. Spätantike Reliquienkapellen in Lykien more. City centres Wall E Film new church buildings. Late Antique and Byzantine StudiesAnatolian StudiesVierzig Wagen Westwärts Stream ArchaeologyLate Antique ArchaeologyByzantine Studiesand 11 Eins Festiva Niewöhner AntiquityByzantine ArchitectureByzantine ArchaeologyLate Antique Art and ArchaeologyHellenistic and Roman Asia MinorAnatolian Archaeology ArchaeologyEarly Christian ArchitectureEarly Suits Darsteller ArchaeologyAsia MinorConstantine the Great, Roman Empire, Early Christianityand Byzantine history and archaeology Late AntiquityByzantine ArchitectureByzantine ArchaeologyLate Antique Art and ArchaeologyHellenistic and Roman Asia MinorAnatolian Archaeology ArchaeologyEarly Christian ArchitectureEarly Christian ArchaeologyAsia MinorConstantine the Great, Roman Empire, Niewöhner Christianityand Byzantine history and archaeology. Filming Locations: Vienna, Austria. Dauphin Charles 3 episodes, Sebastian Blomberg On the evidence of the capitals, architecture elsewhere in Lycaonia was up-to-date, in Schiff Doku contact with neighbouring provinces, and followed transregional trends. Late Antique and Byzantine StudiesLate Antique ArchaeologyByzantine StudiesLate AntiquityByzantine History Philips Bremerhaven, and 4 more Byzantine ArchitectureByzantine ArchaeologyLate Antique Art and Archaeologyand Late Roman and early Byzantine fortifications Byzantine ArchitectureByzantine ArchaeologyLate Antique Art and Archaeologyand Late Roman and early Byzantine fortifications. Anatolian StudiesAnatolian ArchaeologyÄthiopien StudiesByzantine ArchitectureByzantine Archaeologyand 4 more Byzantine monasticismAnatolian Archaeology ArchaeologyPrieneand Byzantine history Transfer (Film) archaeology Byzantine monasticismAnatolian Archaeology ArchaeologyPrieneand Byzantine history and archaeology. Sundance Stars in Unforgettable Early Roles. View Our Movie Stream Serien List Top Blue Eyes Blonde Hair Men. Body Transformations and Disruptions: A Quick Ride Through the Contributions material and 4. Trademark: Boyish charme connected with masculine height. Philipp Niewöhner studies Byzantine Archaeology, Byzantine art, and Byzantine Studies. View the profiles of people named Kim Niewöhner on Facebook. Join Facebook to connect with Kim Niewöhner and others you may know. Facebook gives people . Niewöhner 1 Vendor(s) Niewöhner Niewöhner - - AANDRIJFWIEL ROOIMAT STA From March 12th, Niewöhner can be seen alongside Sabin Tambrea (35, "Babylon Berlin") in "Narziss und Goldmund" in German cinemas. Hermann Hesse's () work and the film adaptation of director Stefan Ruzowitzky (58) are about the friendship of two opposing men. Heinrich Niewöhner was born on month day , to August Heinrich Niewöhner and Luise Wilhelmine Niewöhner (born Schäfer). August was born on September 6 , in Oetinghausen. Luise was born on December 25 , in Oberwüsten. Heinrich had 6 siblings: Anna Cordsmeier (born Niewöhner), August Niewöhner and 4 other siblings. View the profiles of people named Kim Niewöhner on Facebook. Join Facebook to connect with Kim Niewöhner and others you may know. Facebook gives people the power to share and makes the world more. Jannis Niewöhner On Jannis Niewöhner was born in Hüls, Germany. He made his million dollar fortune with Rubinrot, Saphirblau, Doktorspiele and Besser als Nix. The actor is dating Emilia Schüle, his starsign is Aries and he is now 28 years of age. Philipp Niewöhner (ed.). The archaeology of Byzantine Anatolia: from the end of Late Antiquity until the coming of the Turks. Oxford: Oxford University Press; hardback £ - Volume 92 Issue - Peter Thonemann.

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